Today: September 25, 2021 5:10 pm
A collection of Software and Cloud patterns with a focus on the Enterprise

Tag: cloudfoundry


One of the major strengths of CloudFoundry was the adoption of buildpacks. A buildpack represents a blueprint which defines all runtime requirements for an application. These may include web server, application, language, library and any other requirements to run an application. There are many buildpacks available for common environments, such as Java, PHP, Python, Go, etc. It is also easy to fork an existing buildpack or create a new buildpack. When an application is pushed to CloudFoundry, there is a staging step and a deploy step, as shown below. The buildpack comes in......

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Overview of CloudFoundry

CloudFoundry is an opensource Platform as a Service (PaaS) technology originally introduced and commercially supported by Pivotal. The software makes it possible to very easily stage, deploy and scale applications, thanks in part to its adoption of buildpacks which were originally introduced by Heroku. Some software design principles are required to achieve scale with cloud foundry. The most notable design choice is a complete abstraction of persistence, including filesystem, datastore and even in memory cache. This is because instances of an application are transient and stateless. Since this is generally good design anyway,......

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I’m about to write a few articles about creating buildpacks for Stackato, which is a derivative of CloudFoundry and the technology behind Helion Development Platform. The approach for deploying nginx in docker as part of a buildpack differs from the approach I published previously. There are a few reasons for this: Stackato discourages root access to the docker image All services will run as the stackato user The PORT to which services must bind is assigned and in the free range (no root required) Get a host setup to run docker The easiest......

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It seems like most of the development around CloudFoundry and bosh happen on Linux or Mac. Getting things up and running in Windows was a real challenge. Below is how I worked things out. **Make sure you have a modern processor that supports all virtualization technologies, such as VTx and extended paging. Aside from the deviations mentioned below, I’m following the steps documented at https://github.com/cloudfoundry/bosh-lite Changes to Vagrantfile I’m using VirtualBox on Windows 7. To begin with, I modified the Vagrantfile to create two VMs rather than a single VM. The first is......

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I recently published an article to get CloudFoundry running by way of Stackato on a local machine using VirtualBox. As soon as you have something ready to share with the world (testers, executives, investors, etc.), you’ll want something more public. Fortunately, it’s easy to run Stackato on HPCloud.com. I’m following the steps outlined here: https://docs.stackato.com/admin/server/hpcs.html. Configuration of HPCloud.com For the security groups, I created two separate groups, one for SSH and another for web. I do this to allow for separation of access and web service functions in the future (using a Bastian......

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Stackato, which is released by ActiveState, extends out of the box CloudFoundry. It adds a web interface and a command line client (‘stackato’), although the existing ‘cf’ command line client still works (as long as versions match up). Stackato includes some autoscale features and a very well done set of documentation. ActiveState publishes various VM images that can be used to quickly spin up a development environment. These include images for VMWare, KVM and VirtualBox, among others. In this post I’ll walk through getting a Stackato environment running on Windows using VirtualBox. Install......

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I’ve been sneaking up on CloudFoundry for a few weeks now. Each time I try to get a CloudFoundry test environment going I find a couple more technologies that serve either as foundation or support to CloudFoundry. For example, Vagrant, Ansible and Docker all feed into CloudFoundry. Today I come to OpenStack, by way of DevStack (see resources below for more links). Objectives My objectives for this post are get OpenStack up and running by way of DevStack so that I can begin to explore the OpenStack API. CloudFoundry uses the OpenStack API......

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